Lectures & Events

 

Astronomical Society of South Australia presents

Stockport Observatory Public Star Party

Saturday, 16th of February 2013 at 8:30pm (weather permitting)
Stockport Observatory,
Observatory Road, Stockport, S.A.

About the observatory:
Stockport Observatory is located in the small town of Stockport (6kms north-east of Hamley Bridge) approximately 80kms north of Adelaide. It provides a convenient astronomical facility away from the light pollution which surrounds Adelaide (population 1 million).

The Society owns two large observatories in Stockport. One of them houses a 12-inch (30cm) Ritchey-Chrétien, while the Charles Todd Observatory houses the Society's largest telescope at present - the Jubilee Telescope. Stockport Observatory houses three permanently-mounted telescopes as well as some small portable ones.

The Jubilee Telescope is a 20-inch (0.5 metre) Newtonian-Cassegrain reflecting telescope that was built with the assistance of the state's Jubilee 150 Board in 1986. The telescope is computer-controlled and equipped with a ST-6 CCD camera for digital imaging of the night sky. The smaller observatory houses a computerised 12-inch (30cm) Ritchey-Chrétien reflecting telescope. A slide-off roof observatory houses a popular 15-inch (40cm) Newtonian reflecting telescope. The telescopes are used for projects within the Society and to show visitors the beauty of astronomical objects in the southern skies.

In addition to the main observatory buildings, the Stockport site also contains three telescope pads (all with power), a furnished hut with sleeping accommodation and amenities, a large shed seating around 30 people for lectures and slide shows, a BBQ area, shower and toilet facilities, and an off-site car park. Viewing nights will only proceed if the weather is suitable. If in doubt, confirm by visiting our web site or calling (08) 8338 1231 before travelling to any observing session.

There is no need to book - just turn up on the night at pay at the gate
Admission: Adults $10, Children $2
Members: Free For further details visit: http://www.assa.org.au/events/public-viewing-nights/stockport-observatory-star-party/

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The Adelaide Planetarium at the University of South Australia
presents

Constellations of the Zodiac

Saturday 13th of April 2013
7:30pm – 9:30pm (hurry for one night only)
Adelaide Planetarium,
Mawson Lakes Campus,
University of South Australia

Paul Curnow & Martin Lewicki

Abstract: The constellations of the zodiac have fascinated people for eons, come and find out why. Join popular Adelaide astronomy lecturers Paul Curnow and Martin Lewicki, for an evening at the Adelaide Planetarium where they’ll take you on a fascinating tour of the constellations of the zodiac. Learn about the origins of the zodiacal constellations and the mythology behind them. Learn about the geometry of the night sky and the science behind the stars and constellations, in addition to the names of the stars within these stellar patterns.

Bio: Bio: Paul Curnow (B.ED) is a council member of the Astronomical Society of South Australia and a former council member of the Field Geology Club of South Australia. He has been a lecturer at the Adelaide Planetarium since 1992 and was the recipient of the ASSA editor’s award for 2000, and then again in 2010. In 2002, he served as a southern sky specialist for visiting U.S. and British astronomers who were in Australia for the total solar eclipse. He is regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on Australian Aboriginal night sky knowledge; and in 2004, he worked in conjunction with the Lake Erie Nature and Science Center Planetarium in Ohio, on the creation of a show that features Indigenous Australian stories of the night sky. In addition, Paul runs a number of popular courses for the general public that focus on the constellations, planetary astronomy, historical astronomy and ethnoastronomy, which primarily deals with how the night sky is seen by non-western cultures. He appeared as the keynote speaker at the inaugural 2010 Lake Tyrrell Star Party in Sea Lake, Victoria and recently returned from New Zealand after being a special guest speaker at the Carter Observatory in Wellington. Since 2012 - Paul has taken the role of lecturer for the Astronomy & Universe course (EDUC 1036) for the School of Education at the University of South Australia. Paul appears regularly in the media and has authored over 40 articles on astronomy.

Bio: Martin Lewicki is the a member of the Astronomical Society of South Australia (ASSA) and is the serving Light Pollution Officer leading the Dark Sky activity group with the aim of abating excessive light pollution and preserving our starry skies. Martin began his interest in astronomy as a high school student in 1963 and joined the ASSA in 1989. In his time at ASSA has he delivered lectures at the Society meetings and published in the Society Bulletin. His speciality is the workings of the celestial coordinate systems and how they are used for positional astronomy and determining the calendar. He also follows developments in astrophysics and optics. He still uses his home-made 6-inch reflecting telescope he made in 1974 to observe the night sky and uses his camera to capture starry skyscapes at night. Martin began lecturing sessions at the Planetarium in 2005 and presents most of the sessions to schools, clubs and community groups and runs a number of popular short astronomy courses.

To be held at the Adelaide Planetarium (upstairs), Building P, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus. Mawson Lakes Boulevard, Mawson Lakes SA 5095. BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL. Cost $30.00 per person. Enrolments are subject to the seating capacity of the planetarium, so book early to avoid disappointment - to make a booking or for further information phone 8302 3138 or email the planetarium at adelaide.planetarium@unisa.edu.au

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History of Science, Ideas and Technology Group (SA) Inc.
presents;

The Spitfire - WW2 Fighter

Monday, 4th March, 2013 at 7pm
Ira Raymond Exhibition Room, Barr Smith Library,
University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide.

Professor Robin Prior
School of History & Politics
University of Adelaide

The Supermarine Spitfire was one of the most successful fighters of the Second World War and one of the aircraft designed in the 1930's, still flying in 1945. In fact it was used in the air forces of various countries in the post-war period. Its finest hour came during the Battle of Britain (July - November 1940) when it was found that in most conditions it could out-perform the best German fighter (the ME 109) and although outnumbered by the rather forgotten Hurricane, it proved essential in dealing with the enemy fighters. It went through various modifications in the years that followed, having cannon replace its 8 machine guns and even at times having bomb racks fitted.

Following his popular lecture on the Lancaster Bomber in 2012, in this lecture, Robin Prior will trace the history of the Spitfire from the design board to its final supercession by jet fighters. He will concentrate on the Battle of Britain and other aspects of the Second World War.

Entrance to Ira Raymond Room is just inside the main doors of the Barr Smith Library.
Visitors are welcome to attend. Gold coin donation. Supper is available after the talk.

For further information please contact:
Bob Major (Secretary) 0419 800 242, or
Kay Leverett (Committee Member) 8313 4659 kay.leverett@adelaide.edu.au , or
Dr Pauline Payne (President) pauline.payne@adelaide.edu.au

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Sea Lake - Victoria presents the…

Lake Tyrrell Star Party 2013

9th – 11th of March 2013
Lake Tyrrell
Sea Lake, Victoria
(45-min drive from Swan Hill)

Lake Tyrrell has excellent clear and very dark skies. The salt-encrusted Lake Tyrrell is approximately 180 square kilometres in size, making it the largest salt lake in the state of Victoria. In addition, it is located 382 km north west of Melbourne, 7km out of the township of Sea Lake on the Calder Highway, and is about 45-minutes drive from Swan Hill. (Watch this space for programme updates)

Speakers

'Asteroids, Meteorites and the early Earth'
Dr Victor Gostin (University of Adelaide)

Abstract: Order and disorder in planetary systems. Origins and nature of asteroids and meteorites leads to a better understanding of our Earth history with its water and life.

Bio: Assoc. Prof. Victor Gostin, M.Sc. (Melb), PhD (ANU). Victor Gostin is a retired Associate Professor and an Honorary Visiting Research Fellow in Geology and Geophysics at the University of Adelaide, Australia. A graduate of Melbourne University with a PhD from the ANU, Canberra, Victor lectured in earth sciences at Adelaide University from 1970 to 2001. His scientific interests include the origins and evolution of the solar system and of life, meteorite impacts, earth history, environmental geoscience and the effects of natural phenomena on the course of human history. His other interests include sketching the Australian outback. Victor is keen to popularise earth and planetary sciences to the community through lectures and radio. As a result of recognising and proving that a unique rock layer in the ancient rocks of the Flinders Ranges, South Australia, was derived from a giant meteorite impact, he has been honoured by having an asteroid named after him (3640GOSTIN).

'The Tektite Enigma'
Dr Olga Gostin (University of South Australia)


Abstract: Black glassy lumps, "buttons" and "dumbells" found scattered over southeast Asia and south to Australia (=Australites) are believed to have originated from a large asteroidal impact probably into the tropical Laos-Cambodia region. Although some dating suggests this event occurred 780,000 years ago, controversies remain for a possible younger age. Aboriginals have used these objects and have stories of their origin.


Bio: Dr Olga Gostin, BA Hons (Wits), M.Env.St. (Adelaide), PhD (ANU). Of Belgian-Russian parentage, Olga Gostin graduated as a social anthropologist from the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa. She obtained her PhD from the Australian National University in 1968 after completing research on the impact of Catholicism and cash-cropping on the Kuni of Papua. In 1993 she completed a Master’s degree in Environmental Studies at Adelaide University. For the past 40 years she has been connected with Australia’s first program offering tertiary education to Indigenous Australians at the University of South Australia. Olga is passionately interested in the dynamics of culture change, environmental issues and matters of social justice.

'The Great Melbourne Telescope'
Ian Sullivan (Astronomical Society of Victoria & Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society)


Abstract: In the Victorian era, the Great Melbourne Telescope was a significant player in world astronomy, and was not exceeded in size until the next century. It was the gold rushes ensured Melbourne had the resources to accept a great British initiative to uncover the Southern skies. The telescope had an active life of only about twenty years and became a 'museum piece' until it had second life at Mt Stromlo Observatory. After the fire of 2003, its remaining parts have been returned to the Museum Of Victoria, who with the Royal Botanic Gardens and the Astronomical Society of Victoria are planning to restore it to be functioning at the Melbourne Observatory site from whence it came. This presentation describes the rise, fall, and the current attempt to resurrect the 'Great Leviathan of the South'


Bio: Ian Sullivan belongs to ASV and MPAS and has been Vice President of both societies. He has been a Guide at Melbourne Observatory since 1973 and has attended and spoken at, many NACAA and VASTROC conferences. For 20 years he took CAE Astronomy Classes for the public, while being a secondary school science teacher. He still takes U3A classes around Melbourne.

Tour of the Night Sky
Paul Curnow, B.ED. (University of South Australia)


Abstract: The night sky has fascinated people since the dawn of humankind. Australia is still fortunate in that it has relatively low levels of light pollution, which allows us some of the best night sky views in the world. We will take a guided tour of the brightest stars, the constellations, their mythology, and the way that other cultures like Aboriginal Australians perceive the celestial dance of stars above.


Bio: Bio: Paul Curnow (B.ED) is a council member of the Astronomical Society of South Australia and a former council member of the Field Geology Club of South Australia. He has been a lecturer at the Adelaide Planetarium since 1992 and was the recipient of the ASSA editor’s award for 2000, and then again in 2010. In 2002, he served as a southern sky specialist for visiting U.S. and British astronomers who were in Australia for the total solar eclipse. He is regarded as one of the world’s leading authorities on Australian Aboriginal night sky knowledge; and in 2004, he worked in conjunction with the Lake Erie Nature and Science Center Planetarium in Ohio, on the creation of a show that features Indigenous Australian stories of the night sky. In addition, Paul runs a number of popular courses for the general public that focus on the constellations, planetary astronomy, historical astronomy and ethnoastronomy, which primarily deals with how the night sky is seen by non-western cultures. He appeared as the keynote speaker at the inaugural 2010 Lake Tyrrell Star Party in Sea Lake, Victoria and recently returned from New Zealand after being a special guest speaker at the Carter Observatory in Wellington. Since 2012 - Paul has taken the role of lecturer for the Astronomy & Universe course (EDUC 1036) for the School of Education at the University of South Australia. Paul appears regularly in the media and has authored over 40 articles on astronomy.

Accommodation Options:

Thisledome Motel, Sea Lake - 03 5070 1252 - 14 rooms - Very comfortable!

Sea Lake Hotel - 03 5070 1167 - 21 beds

Nandaly Hotel - 03 5078 1220 - 3 motel-style rooms. Good host! 20 miles north of Sea Lake on Calder Highway.

Kaneira Hotel, Culgoa - 03 5077 2330 - 6 twin rooms - Unknown standard. 20 miles south of Sea Lake on Calder Highway.

Sea Lake Recreation Reserve Caravan Park - 03 5070 2242 - 9 powered sites. Centre of town!

Green Lake Caravan Park - no bookings required, fees collected daily or honesty box - 68 powered sites. 10 kilometres south of Sea Lake off Birchip Road.

Green Lake Lions Camp - Ron Allan 03 5070 2090 - up to 72 beds, BYO bedding - beds and mattresses only. No eating/cooking facilities.

For further information contact:
Keva Lloyd (Organising committee) at: kevalloyd@fastmail.com.au
Pat Amos (Organising committee) at: amos.patricia.d@edumail.vic.gov.au

Visit Sea Lake: http://sealake.vic.au/


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The Astronomical Society of South Australia presents


Beautiful World At Night


Wednesday 6th of March 2013 at 8pm
Kerr Grant Lecture Theatre
2nd Floor, Physics Building
University of Adelaide
North Terrace, Adelaide

 
Alex Cherney
Astronomical Society of Victoria &
Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society

Abstract: In this presentation Alex Cherney showcases some of his incredibly stunning photos and videos of beautiful landscapes under the starry skies. He will present some of the world’s best observatories and share tips for wide-field astro-photography with a basic DSLR and a tripod.

Bio: Alex Cherney is a software developer and consultant during the day and a keen astronomer and photographer at night. His daughter's kindergarten project on space inspired Alex to take up astronomy in 2007 and led to his passion in wide-field astrophotography. Alex finds the time-lapse imaging of night sky particularly appealing because it shows the motion of celestial bodies in relation to the landscape and helps connect viewers with the night sky.

Alex travels throughout Australia to photograph the most beautiful landscapes under the stars of the Milky Way and loves to connect ocean, land and sky in his work. His images and videos have been published on NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day, in well-known astronomy magazines and books and won prestigious Australian and international awards, including the STARMUS astrophotography competition, numerous David Malin astrophotography awards, International Earth and Sky Photo Contest by TWAN, and the South Pacific Star Party AstroImaging competition.

Alex is a passionate amateur astronomer and an active member of Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society, Astronomical Society of Victoria and The World At Night (TWAN). He enjoys helping out to get people involved with astronomy at public and school viewing nights. Alex is currently studying astronomy at Swinburne Astronomy Online. Alex keeps an online blog with images and videos at www.terrastro.com

Free – visitors welcome

The Astronomical Society of South Australia presents an Astronomy Education lecture

Jovian Planets


Wednesday 6th of March 2013 at 7pm
Kerr Grant Lecture Theatre
2nd Floor, Physics Building
University of Adelaide
North Terrace, Adelaide


Colin Hill
Astronomical Society of South Australia

Out past the main asteroid belt lies the realm of the giant planets. Find out how the four gas planets formed and become so large. We will also look at their internal structure and explore the different ring systems circling each of these worlds.

Free – visitors welcome

For further information visit: http://www.assa.org.au/
Or contact the Publicity Officer on: 0402 079 578
 

 

 

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Updated 14th February 2013